Thursday, 20 September 2018

Mediums/clairvoyants Take a peep



Mediums/Clairvoyants
Years ago I would visit mediums for a reading on a regular basis. I found the thought that they could speak to the dead fascinating and would listen avidly to what they told me. I did not always know the people they mentioned to me and the medium would tell me to ask my family and they would tell me. When I asked my mother who the medium had spoken about to me, she hadn't a clue. Neither did other family members. Maybe a few crossed wires from the World of Spirit.
I would also visit tarot card readers and one lady who only read the playing cards. She was excellent, and the predictions that she made for me always happened. Like many reader's predictions though they would happen in a different way to how you thought that they would come.
The best medium I ever visited on a regular basis was a lady by the name of Doreen Shadbolt.  She certainly had a wonderful gift and was well known in the area of Staffordshire where she lived, and way beyond that as well. So many predictions she gave came true I was truly astounded. I admit that after my first visit to her I laughed on the way home saying none of what she had told me would come true. It did! She said that I would write books, that I would go on the radio, I did. And many other predictions she gave me that day all came about in ways I never thought could happen. An amazing lady. Sadly Doreen no longer works due to ill health. But in her time she helped many people.
I came across quite a few readers and mediums who gave me reading that did not come true. I thought that maybe the day I visited them was not the right time. I did not go back to them again as I did not want to risk losing any more money.
I also became friendly with a lady who worked in Birmingham City Centre. She had a couple of offices in a huge building. There were a lot of stairs to climb to reach the floor she was on! I dislike lifts, so that was my problem, not hers!
Joanne read the playing cards. In years to come, I tried teaching myself how to read the playing cards as Jo was excellent at it. I never really felt happy with them. In time I settled to reading the tarot cards, and once I felt confident enough, I read for the general public. I still do if anyone asks for a reading.
I have met a few people who are against people reading cards or other items to make predictions. In my, opinion, if a reading from a professional reader helps someone, then it can only be a good thing.


Wednesday, 19 September 2018

Costochondritis - NHS Website Useful links and information

 

 There is some useful information on the UK NHS website, Here's the link to it.

 https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/costochondritis/

If you have suffer from this painful condition this link may help you.

Costochondritis


Costochondritis is the medical term for inflammation of the cartilage that joins your ribs to your breastbone (sternum). This area is known as the costochondral joint.
Cartilage is tough but flexible connective tissue found throughout the body, including in the joints between bones. It acts as a shock absorber, cushioning the joints.
Costochondritis may improve on its own after a few weeks, although it can last for several months or more. The condition doesn't lead to any permanent problems, but may sometimes relapse.

Tietze's syndrome

Costochondritis may be confused with a separate condition called Tietze's syndrome. Both conditions involve inflammation of the costochondral joint and can cause very similar symptoms.
However, Tietze's syndrome is much less common and often causes chest swelling, which may last after any pain and tenderness has gone.
Costochondritis also tends to affect adults aged 40 or over, whereas Tietze's syndrome usually affects young adults under 40.
As the conditions are very similar, most of the information below also applies to Tietze's syndrome.

Signs and symptoms

When the costochondral joint becomes inflamed it can result in sharp chest pain and tenderness, which may develop gradually or start suddenly.
The pain may be made worse by:
  • a particular posture – such as lying down
  • pressure on your chest – such as wearing a seatbelt or hugging someone
  • deep breathing, coughing and sneezing
  • physical activity

When to seek medical help

It can be difficult to tell the difference between the chest pain associated with costochondritis and pain caused by more serious conditions, such as a heart attack.
However, a heart attack usually causes more widespread pain and additional symptoms, such as breathlessness, nausea and sweating.
If you, or someone you're with, experiences sudden chest pain and you think there's a possibility it could be a heart attack, dial 999 immediately and ask for an ambulance.
If you've had chest pain for a while, don't ignore it. Make an appointment to see your GP so they can investigate the cause.

Causes of costochondritis

Inflammation is the body's natural response to infection, irritation or injury.
It's not known exactly why the costochondral joint becomes inflamed, but in some cases it's been linked to:
  • severe coughing – which strains your chest area
  • an injury to your chest
  • physical strain from repeated exercise or sudden exertion that you're not used to – such as moving furniture
  • an infection – including respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and wound infections
  • wear and tear – your chest moves in and out 20 to 30 times a minute, and over time this motion can lead to discomfort in these joints

Diagnosing costochondritis

If you have symptoms of costochondritis, your GP will examine and touch the upper chest area around your costochondral joint. They'll ask you when and where your pain occurs and look at your recent medical history.
Before a diagnosis can be confirmed, some tests may need to be carried out to rule out other possible causes of your chest pain.
These may include:
If no other condition is suspected or found, a diagnosis of costrochondritis may be made.

Costochondritis


Costochondritis is the medical term for inflammation of the cartilage that joins your ribs to your breastbone (sternum). This area is known as the costochondral joint.
Cartilage is tough but flexible connective tissue found throughout the body, including in the joints between bones. It acts as a shock absorber, cushioning the joints.
Costochondritis may improve on its own after a few weeks, although it can last for several months or more. The condition doesn't lead to any permanent problems, but may sometimes relapse.

Tietze's syndrome

Costochondritis may be confused with a separate condition called Tietze's syndrome. Both conditions involve inflammation of the costochondral joint and can cause very similar symptoms.
However, Tietze's syndrome is much less common and often causes chest swelling, which may last after any pain and tenderness has gone.
Costochondritis also tends to affect adults aged 40 or over, whereas Tietze's syndrome usually affects young adults under 40.
As the conditions are very similar, most of the information below also applies to Tietze's syndrome.

Signs and symptoms

When the costochondral joint becomes inflamed it can result in sharp chest pain and tenderness, which may develop gradually or start suddenly.
The pain may be made worse by:
  • a particular posture – such as lying down
  • pressure on your chest – such as wearing a seatbelt or hugging someone
  • deep breathing, coughing and sneezing
  • physical activity

When to seek medical help

It can be difficult to tell the difference between the chest pain associated with costochondritis and pain caused by more serious conditions, such as a heart attack.
However, a heart attack usually causes more widespread pain and additional symptoms, such as breathlessness, nausea and sweating.
If you, or someone you're with, experiences sudden chest pain and you think there's a possibility it could be a heart attack, dial 999 immediately and ask for an ambulance.
If you've had chest pain for a while, don't ignore it. Make an appointment to see your GP so they can investigate the cause.

Causes of costochondritis

Inflammation is the body's natural response to infection, irritation or injury.
It's not known exactly why the costochondral joint becomes inflamed, but in some cases it's been linked to:
  • severe coughing – which strains your chest area
  • an injury to your chest
  • physical strain from repeated exercise or sudden exertion that you're not used to – such as moving furniture
  • an infection – including respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and wound infections
  • wear and tear – your chest moves in and out 20 to 30 times a minute, and over time this motion can lead to discomfort in these joints

Diagnosing costochondritis

If you have symptoms of costochondritis, your GP will examine and touch the upper chest area around your costochondral joint. They'll ask you when and where your pain occurs and look at your recent medical history.
Before a diagnosis can be confirmed, some tests may need to be carried out to rule out other possible causes of your chest pain.
These may include:
If no other condition is suspected or found, a diagnosis of costrochondritis may be made.

Tips for people suffering with Fybromyalgia



A little information on Fybromyalgia from the NHS website UK - This is a brilliant site for tips on all aspects of fibromyalgia.


Discomfort is commonly felt in areas known as tender points, such as the lower neck and shoulders, throughout the back and hips, and along the arms and legs, explains the NIAMS. Frequent headaches and menstrual cramp aches are typical symptoms of fibromyalgia. Aside from direct pain, tingling of the hands and feet, or complete body stiffness, is prevalent as well. The widespread pain ultimately results in constant fatigue.

Widespread pain
If you have fibromyalgia, one of the main symptoms is likely to be widespread pain. This may be felt throughout your body, but could be worse in particular areas, such as your back or neck. The pain is likely to be continuous, although it may be better or more severe at different times.
The pain could feel like:
  • an ache
  • a burning sensation
  • a sharp, stabbing pain
Extreme sensitivity
Fibromyalgia can make you extremely sensitive to pain all over your body, and you may find that even the slightest touch is painful. If you hurt yourself – such as stubbing your toe – the pain may continue for much longer than it normally would.
You may hear the condition described in the following medical terms:
  • hyperalgesia – when you're extremely sensitive to pain
  • allodynia – when you feel pain from something that shouldn't be painful at all, such as a very light touch
You may also be sensitive to things such as smoke, certain foods and bright lights. Being exposed to something you're sensitive to can cause your other fibromyalgia symptoms to flare up.

Stiffness

Fibromyalgia can make you feel stiff. The stiffness may be most severe when you've been in the same position for a long period of time – for example, when you first wake up in the morning.
It can also cause your muscles to spasm, which is when they contract (squeeze) tightly and painfully.


Fatigue

Fibromyalgia can cause fatigue (extreme tiredness). This can range from a mild, tired feeling to the exhaustion often experienced during a flu-like illness.
Severe fatigue may come on suddenly and can drain you of all your energy. If this happens, you may feel too tired to do anything at all.

Poor sleep quality

Fibromyalgia can affect your sleep. You may often wake up tired, even when you've had plenty of sleep. This is because the condition can sometimes prevent you from sleeping deeply enough to refresh you properly.

Cognitive problems ('fibro-fog')

Cognitive problems are issues related to mental processes, such as thinking and learning. If you have fibromyalgia, you may have:
  • trouble remembering and learning new things
  • problems with attention and concentration
  • slowed or confused speech


Headaches

If fibromyalgia has caused you to experience pain and stiffness in your neck and shoulders, you may also have frequent headaches.
These can vary from being mild headaches to severe migraines, and could also involve other symptoms, such as nausea (feeling sick).

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

Some people with fibromyalgia also develop irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
IBS is a common digestive condition that causes pain and bloating in your stomach. It can also lead to constipation or diarrhoea.

Other symptoms

Other symptoms that people with fibromyalgia sometimes experience include:

Depression

In some cases, having the condition can lead to depression. This is because fibromyalgia can be difficult to deal with, and low levels of certain hormones associated with the condition can make you prone to developing depression.
Depression can cause many symptoms, including:
  • constantly feeling low
  • feeling hopeless and helpless
  • losing interest in the things you usually enjoy
If you think you may be depressed, it's important to get help from your GP or your fibromyalgia healthcare professional, if you've been seeing one.